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Friday, December 14, 2007

A Magical December In Williamsburg

During the 8 years we lived in the Norfolk, Virginia area, it was our tradition to spend as much time as possible in Williamsburg, VA. We particularly loved being in Colonial Williamsburg during the Christmas season. We were there during sunshine but it was while we were there in the snow that this special spot seemed to be touched with a little magic... Since the first organized Christmas celebration drew visitors to Colonial Williamsburg in 1936, nothing quite matches the excitement, sights, smells, sounds, and grandeur of the Christmas Season in Colonial Williamsburg. But how did the celebration evolve? No one really expected anyone to visit newly restored Colonial Williamsburg during the holidays in 1934, but colored lights were strung on ten evergreen trees in the Historic Area. Foundation president Kenneth Chorley was not very pleased with the effort and directed the research department to find authentic historical practices that could be revived. The historians came up empty, as Christmas was not much of a holiday in colonial America. Most Virginians were members of the Anglican Church, and as such, observed the season of Advent, a time of fasting and repentance, followed by a celebratory meal Christmas Day. Letters and diaries refer to church services and a nice meal. Servants were sometimes given a half day off and a coin. Discouraged but not daunted, Chorley was determined to find a festive way to celebrate the season. Landscape architect Arthur Shurcliff recalled a practice his family had begun in Boston in 1893 and suggested placing a single lighted candle in the windows of the four buildings open to the public in those days. The candles were lit from 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. between Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve. Louise Fisher, who was in charge of flowers, decorated the doors and windows of the Palace and the Raleigh Tavern with simple fresh greenery. Nervous about fire, Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin, rector of Bruton Parish Church, insisted the candles be placed in a dish of water. Four janitors were paid $1.00 apiece to light the candles and guard against fires. With the availability of electric candles, the practice gained in popularity throughout the community, to the point that visitors to Colonial Williamsburg wanted to purchase the candles to take back to their own communities. In 1941, local department stores sold their entire stock of 600 electric candles by Christmas Eve. Today, the practice has spread all across America and is attributed to Colonial Williamsburg, even though the Foundation made it clear it was not a historically accurate holiday practice. Fireworks were a popular 18th-century attraction fired in honor of a monarch's birthday or a great victory. In 1957, as part of the celebration for the 350th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown, Colonial Williamsburg set off fireworks on Market Square. From then on, fireworks have been an integral part of the Colonial Williamsburg Christmas experience. Today, fireworks, candles, cressets, and small street fires are all a part of the Christmas season in Colonial Williamsburg, which officially begins with Grand Illumination the first Sunday in December. The "simple fresh greenery" has evolved into elaborate decorations hand-made from fresh fruits, vegetables, and evergreens adorning doors, windows, fences, lampposts, and transoms. Far from a time of repentance, the month of December is full of fine food, music, laughter, and a true sense of magic. It may not be the way the holiday was celebrated in colonial America, but the Christmas season in Colonial Williamsburg has evolved into a tradition recognized all across America. And absolutely nothing says Colonial Williamsburg like the decorations that fill the Historic Area during the Christmas season. Miles upon miles of pine roping, truckloads of greenery, and bushels of fresh fruit combine to give Colonial Williamsburg its much-imitated but never-duplicated charm and elegance. Although the practice of decorating with natural materials did not originate in Williamsburg, every year, guests come to see the fragrant handmade decorations that have become the signature of Colonial Williamsburg's Christmas season. It is a wonderful place to visit in all four seasons but never more so than during the month of December!

24 comments:

Gretchen said...

Thanks for the history lesson and the magical pictures you shared, Sue. xxxooogretchen

Janet said...

I have only been to Williamsburg once ( maybe 1968 hmm, how could that be, I couldn't be that old, could I?)in late December and I remember that it was beautiful and there were some very good shops nearby. I think I would appreciate it more now, but who has time for travel at Christmas??

Janet

Southern Heart said...

Do you know that I've been googling for Williamsburg photos this year? It was always a favorite of my parents, and I am wanting to change some of my outdoor decor to a more "Williamsburg-y" look next year. I loved seeing your photos, and especially hearing the interesting history of the decor and traditions there.

I loved this post! :)

xo, Andrea

DebraK from ~the Bunnies Bungalow~ said...

Lovely! Someday I really hope to visit there during the holidays. Thanks for the info & the wonderful pictures.

Holiday hugs, DebraK

Sandi @the WhistleStop Cafe said...

Thanks for sharing the beautiful southern christmas traditions. A dusting of snow will really make it special!

PEA said...

Oh Sue, I'm packing my bags and heading to Williamsburg!!! I wish it was that easy! lol Oh my, what a magical place at Christmas time...I just LOVE the various wreaths, how beautiful they all are. I so enjoyed reading the story behind the decor!! Love ya! xoxo

Mary said...

Oh Sue, thanks for sharing -- it's all so beautiful! We've been to Williamsburg in the summer, but I'd love to go for the Christmas season!
xoxo,
Mary

Rosemary said...

I have always wanted to go there.
Thanks for the tour.
Rosemary

smilnsigh said...

Oh sigh... Beautiful photos. I'd love to visit there, at Holiday Time.

Mari-Nanci

Susie said...

What a festived place to visit during the holidays! The rich history of Williamsburg just adds to the charm.
xo

Andi said...

How beautiful! Perhaps we should have our get together there...I've never been and it sounds wonderful!!!

Gillian @ Indigo Blue said...

Oooh, add Williamsburg to my list of places to see before I croak.
What a beee-utiful place! I dig that history as well...thanks for sharing.
Hope you are enjoying the holiday season Q,
xo
Gillian

Valerie said...

i so wish we could've gone in December. October was pretty cool to see Williamsburg, but your photos are beyond amazing.

BittersweetPunkin said...

I love American History!! Looks like a magical place!
Blessings,
Robin

Brenda said...

Thanks you so much Sue. I want to retire to Virginia so bad.Hubby is from Arkansas and would like to go that way,but when we just drive through to visit Rian im in love.

Sandi McBride said...

Wow Sue, there's nothing I love better than a History lesson...I mean that. I'm addicted to History and better yet what my Grandmother (a teacher) used to call Herstory...the truth! Oh, and I have tagged you, so come see me and find out the rules....
xo
Sandi

PAT said...

We visited Colonial Williamsburg in April 2005. I've always heard how amazing it is at Christmas!

Knowing how much you enjoy lists, I've tagged you, dear Sue, for the Holiday Hoopla Tag. Please drop by the back porch for details!

Pat

The Feathered Nest said...

That's one place I've always wanted to visit, especially in summer when the gardens are so beautiful!

Manuela

Terri and Bob said...

I have always wanted to visit Williamsburg at Christmas. I hope to do that when I retire! I have a long list of must dos when I can! Your photos are magical!

JafaBrit's Art said...

HUm, me thinks I might want to do that next year. I have been during the summer, but it looks just magical during the winter.

Dawn Bibbs said...

Oh my, those pictures are beautiful. I've never been to VA before...I don't get out of Ga much :-).

Pamela said...

I may never get to see it - so I have to absorb your posts about it

Strawberry Lane said...

What wonderful photographs and interesting details about Williamsburg.

I visited there years ago, so your descriptions brought back lots of warm memories.

How special to be there at Christmas time!

Carrie said...

Thank you for the historical background on Colonial Williamsburg.
Carrie